2 General Responses to “Jesus is a Pagan Copycat.”

 
In the 19th century a group of scholars listed all the parallels between Jesus and previous religions. This view is no longer held among the consensus of New Testament scholars. There are two general reasons for this:

  1. Most of the parallels are superficial at best. One would have to conflate many different beliefs of various religions together to arrive at the Gospel narrative.
  2. There is no evidence of a historical causal link of those beliefs to the 1st century Jews who would have had to make the story up.

This is not to say that there aren’t some interesting parallels between stories of the Bible and other ancient religions. Noah’s Flood and the Epic of Gilgamesh, Moses and Sargon, and others are good examples. Each has their own explanation. A good rule of thumb is to check the parallels between Jesus and the supposed “original” religious beliefs. One who actually believed in that religion might be surprised that you can even compare the two.

This argument’s strongest point is it’s emotional effect on believers that Christianity is “just another religion” (not unique) among many others.

Source: http://www.reasonablefaith.org/jesus-and-pagan-mythology

Book to Read: The Case for the Real Jesus by Lee Strobel

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2 thoughts on “2 General Responses to “Jesus is a Pagan Copycat.”

  1. When Osiris is said to bring his believers eternal life in Egyptian Heaven, contemplating the unutterable, indescribable glory of God, we understand that as a myth.

    When the sacred rites of Demeter at Eleusis are described as bringing believers happiness in their eternal life, we understand that as a myth.

    In fact, when ancient writers tell us that in general ancient people believed in eternal life, with the good going to the Elysian Fields and the not so good going to Hades, we understand that as a myth.

    When Vespatian’s spittle healed a blind man, we understand that as a myth.

    When Apollonius of Tyana raised a girl from death, we understand that as a myth.

    When the Pythia , the priestess at the Oracle at Delphi, in Greece, prophesied, and over and over again for a thousand years, the prophecies came true, we understand that as a myth.

    When Dionysus turned water into wine, we understand that as a myth. When Dionysus believers are filled with atay, the Spirit of God, we understand that as a myth.

    When Romulus is described as the Son of God, born of a virgin, we understand that as a myth.

    When Alexander the Great is described as the Son of God, born of a mortal woman, we understand that as a myth.

    When Augustus is described as the Son of God, born of a mortal , we understand that as a myth.

    When Dionysus is described as the Son of God, born of a mortal woman,we understand that as a myth.

    When Scipio Africanus is described as the Son of God, born of a mortal woman, we understand that as a myth.

    So how come when Jesus is described as
    the Son of God,
    born of a mortal woman,
    according to prophecy,
    turning water into wine,
    raising girls from the dead, and
    healing blind men with his spittle,
    and setting it up so His believers got eternal life in Heaven contemplating the unutterable, indescribable glory of God, and off to Hades—er, I mean Hell—for the bad folks…

    …how come that’s NOT a myth?

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